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Hand Contractures Treatment

Try to flex your fingers as hard as you can, if you have problem or difficulty in achieving a full stretch, your fingers to be fully straight, and then you might be suffering from a disorder commonly known as hand contractures, in other terms known as Dupuytren’s disease. Hand contractures usually happen with the pinky and the ring finger. The middle finger sometimes is affected but the thumb and the pointer finger are spared most of the time. This condition might be irritating and later on will cause problems. In the long run, the fingers will eventually come closer to the palm and would result to uselessness of the hand itself.

Causes and Origin

This disease is known to affect the tissues that are found under the skin of the palm. Later on, these tissues tighten and will cause the fingers to move closer to the palm. Through recent studies and research, there is not much known cause or origin of this disease but it might run along the gene. Research states that people with hand contractures had them in their bloodline, but other than that, trauma is a possible cause also. According to recent studies, it has been seen that there are signs of minor bleeding within the tissue affected symbolizing trauma. This trauma is may be caused by hard labor. This disease is usually seen in aging males and is not likely in females. But there are cases of younger individuals who suffer from the disease itself, there are Hand Contractures Treatment to help lessen the development, or to actually cure the disease.

Hand Contractures Treatment

Different Treatments

In the early stages of hand contracture, when symptoms start to develop, cortisone injections are the usual treatment. With the use of the injections, the tightening of the tissues is either lessened or stopped. But in worse cases in which there are recognizable effects like inability to move the pinky or the ring finger, surgery is the most applicable treatment that can be done. There are two ways in treating severe case hand contractures, the common and the earliest form is through the process of an open surgery. In this process, large cuts are made on the palm and also on the affected fingers. The contracted or contracting tissues are then removed. The problem with this procedure is that it leaves large scars and is more likely to develop complications compared to needle aponeurotomy.

NA or needle aponeurotomy, on the other hand, is a much more delicate process in which a needle is used to separate the contracting tissue under the skin. The good side with this procedure is that this will only leave small scar marks on the hand and is less likely to develop complications compared with the open surgery.

Hand contracture will certainly redevelop itself after a period of time whether you treat it through surgery or NA, NA will cause it to come back with a time span of at least 3 years while surgery, on the other hand, is 5 years.

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Vikings Disease in the Hands

In early ages, a large fleet of Vikings invaded England and conquered the land for nearly 300 years. It is said that the Vikings were mainly responsible for the disease that spread across England which were also named after them – the Viking’s disease. Vikings disease is the shortening and hardening of tissues. Generally, this can be seen happening in the hands mostly but there are also cases that they occur between the sole of the foot and the toes. Other term for Vikings diseases in hands is the Dupuytren’s disease. This happens between the fingers and the palms. What happens is that the tissue underneath the skin of the palm and finger that connects them contracts and hardens resulting to the fingers, usually the ring finger and pinky, gradually come closer to the palm.

Vikings Disease in the Hands

The symptoms of Vikings disease is an uneven thickening of the skin on the hand between the palm and the fingers. It will later develop a dimple and when left untreated will then harden. Furthermore in this stage, the hard lump of skin may not be painful to the touch but is very sensitive. Vikings disease runs through the blood, meaning it is a hereditary disease though there are factors that may trigger this. It also cannot be permanently treated. There are surgeries used to momentarily “cure” the disease in order to achieve full productivity of the hand. Injections are also used like cortisone to slow down or to momentarily stop the contraction of the tissue. In severe cases, it might be advised to remove the hardened contracted muscle through surgery. However, after 3 to 5 years, the disease will redevelop and it will need another treatment.

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Trigger Finger Injection

The fingers are used every day in any point of the day, in any effective synthesized. Any pain or discomfort can be directly recognizable. While typing, there is a partial pain or discomfort in your middle finger as you bend it and suddenly it locks and is unable to straighten out for a few moments in which it simply clicks back to normal. This can be a symptom of a disease called trigger finger that involves the finger to be locked in a bent position and in severe cases, other than an annoyance will also cause pain. Basically, the tendon is covered with a sheath that is surrounded by a lubricant producing structure. When that structure is swollen, it will not produce the lubricant causing the tendon to be unable to simply glide through the sheath. Trigger finger injection is a method used to relieve this type of condition. There are certain cases in which this is no longer effective, surgery may be required to remove the sheath that is constricting the tendon.

Trigger Finger Injection

The injection used is a type of corticosteroid that has anti-inflammatory properties. It is injected on the tendon where the finger constantly locks. After the injection, the patient is advised to frequently move and flick the finger in order to spread the corticosteroid. At first, this is documented to be painful, but the pain is said to last about 5 to 10 seconds and after that period, the corticosteroid’s anti-inflammatory properties will kick in. This is the most effective method in treating trigger finger, but there are also side effects documented with the injection. The corticosteroid will cause a slight elevation in blood glucose level, though not very important for some patients but might be vital with diabetic people. It may also lead in slight discoloration and patients might feel minor clicking of the finger, all of which are normal and are just side effects of the injection.

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