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Dupuytren’s Disease Symptoms

The role of the hand in our lives is very vital in maintaining a normal way of living. If anything happens to our hands, there will be a decrease in our daily productivity. A multitude of disease may hit our hands. It could come from viruses or bacteria, and also there are the common tissue disorders. One of the hand diseases that affect both the palm and the finger is the disease known as the hand contractures or the Dupuytren’s disease. This is a type of disease that slowly causes the tightening of tissues found underneath the skin of the palm and fingers. Because of the tightening, this will result in the bending of fingers towards the palms, not allowing an individual to fully stretch their fingers on the long run, or more severely, not allowing the fingers to move. Dupuytren’s disease, as of the moment, is known to be a disease that is inherited. There are medical remedies like injecting cortisone to prevent further tightening of the tissues. There are also surgeries that will help treat individuals with a much more severe case. The easiest way to prevent resolving this disease through surgery is by knowing the early developmental stages and learning Dupuytren’s disease symptoms.

Dupuytren’s Disease Symptoms

Dupuytren’s disease is a naturally occurring disease under the skin, through the start of its development and in its early stages, pain is not a symptom. Moreover, there are no recognizable symptoms in the first stages of tightening. But later on, there are visible marks and changes on the hand. The earliest visible symptom is the recognizable abnormal thickening of the skin, it can be said that it is an abnormal growth when the thickness of the skin is not equal along the rest of the palm. The thickening can be seen near the ring finger and pinky. After a time, recognizable dimples will develop and can be seen. If still left untreated, the skin will continually harden and will result in a much larger clump of skin on the palm. The skin, in turn, will start to become very sensitive to the touch but not actually painful. The symptoms will get worse. The lump will eventually grow larger and harder. In severe cases, a tendon like form can be seen. It is then recognizable to be unable to fully stretch the fingers. Later on, the fingers will be visibly closer to the palm and can no longer be fully straightened. In this case, the disease has reached its middle stages and must be checked by a specialist before the hand may lose its capability of moving.

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Vikings Disease in the Hands

In early ages, a large fleet of Vikings invaded England and conquered the land for nearly 300 years. It is said that the Vikings were mainly responsible for the disease that spread across England which were also named after them – the Viking’s disease. Vikings disease is the shortening and hardening of tissues. Generally, this can be seen happening in the hands mostly but there are also cases that they occur between the sole of the foot and the toes. Other term for Vikings diseases in hands is the Dupuytren’s disease. This happens between the fingers and the palms. What happens is that the tissue underneath the skin of the palm and finger that connects them contracts and hardens resulting to the fingers, usually the ring finger and pinky, gradually come closer to the palm.

Vikings Disease in the Hands

The symptoms of Vikings disease is an uneven thickening of the skin on the hand between the palm and the fingers. It will later develop a dimple and when left untreated will then harden. Furthermore in this stage, the hard lump of skin may not be painful to the touch but is very sensitive. Vikings disease runs through the blood, meaning it is a hereditary disease though there are factors that may trigger this. It also cannot be permanently treated. There are surgeries used to momentarily “cure” the disease in order to achieve full productivity of the hand. Injections are also used like cortisone to slow down or to momentarily stop the contraction of the tissue. In severe cases, it might be advised to remove the hardened contracted muscle through surgery. However, after 3 to 5 years, the disease will redevelop and it will need another treatment.

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The Risk Factors and the Cause of Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren’s contracture which is also referred to as the Dupuytren’s disease is a deformity of the hand which causes its tissues beneath the hand to contract and thicken. A prominent and initial symptom of this disease is the thickening of a person’s palm. Lumps under the palm’s skin, which often vary in number, might appear most often at the pinkie or ring finger’s base.

As this disease continues to progress, the lumps – sometimes called nodules, will develop into hard bands and cords which can extend to the fingers. The fingers’ cords will eventually contract and will make finger extension impossible to do. Household chores like washing dishes and exercises as shaking the hands will eventually become impossible or difficult.

Risk Factors

Although not too many people know about Dupuytren’s contracture, Keith Segalman – a hand surgeon has seen thousands of this disease’s cases already. While this condition is not new anymore, the disease’s origin still is a mystery. According to Dr. Segalman, “We have already studied the possible several reasons for this. However, there is still no definite cause of Dupuytren’s contracture. Here are some of the medical experts’ speculations about the cause of the disease:

Heredity

According to Taizoon Baxamusa – a surgeon and spokesperson of the Orthopedic Surgeons of America, “this disease is in bloodlines”. This does not imply that since your mother had Dupuytren’s disease, you automatically will have it too. This just means that you have a higher risk of developing the disease too.

Ancestry

Most often, Dupuytren’s disease is observed in the people of the Northern part of Europe like the French, Dutch, Irish, Scottish and English people or the Scandinavians such as the Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish and Danish people. However, this disease could be developed by just any race and ethnicity.

Age and Gender

Men are the ones which are more likely to have the disease than women and this condition most often appear when the person reaches 40. If women develop this condition, these are observed to occur in the later stage of their lives with milder symptoms.

Seizure Disorders and Diabetes

The Risk Factors and the Cause of Dupuytren’s Contracture

Actually, experts still do not know the relationship between the disease and these disorders. However, medical professionals have revealed that the symptoms and Dupuytren are less severe with patients that have Diabetes. Although excessive use of the hand, as well as, injury are not connected to the emergence of Dupuytren’s disease; however, people that have hand trauma have higher risks of developing the disease.

Almost always, patients think that hand trauma and Dupuytren’s disease are connected because they tend to experience symptoms when they are doing activities that involve the hands. Because the disease is common in male senior citizens, a few men notice nodules on both of their palms first especially with those that are playing golf.

While there are medical experts that cite tobacco and alcohol as risk factors, these are just assumptions. People with Nordic and Northern European descent still have a higher population of Dupuytren’s patients.

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Trigger Finger Injection

The fingers are used every day in any point of the day, in any effective synthesized. Any pain or discomfort can be directly recognizable. While typing, there is a partial pain or discomfort in your middle finger as you bend it and suddenly it locks and is unable to straighten out for a few moments in which it simply clicks back to normal. This can be a symptom of a disease called trigger finger that involves the finger to be locked in a bent position and in severe cases, other than an annoyance will also cause pain. Basically, the tendon is covered with a sheath that is surrounded by a lubricant producing structure. When that structure is swollen, it will not produce the lubricant causing the tendon to be unable to simply glide through the sheath. Trigger finger injection is a method used to relieve this type of condition. There are certain cases in which this is no longer effective, surgery may be required to remove the sheath that is constricting the tendon.

Trigger Finger Injection

The injection used is a type of corticosteroid that has anti-inflammatory properties. It is injected on the tendon where the finger constantly locks. After the injection, the patient is advised to frequently move and flick the finger in order to spread the corticosteroid. At first, this is documented to be painful, but the pain is said to last about 5 to 10 seconds and after that period, the corticosteroid’s anti-inflammatory properties will kick in. This is the most effective method in treating trigger finger, but there are also side effects documented with the injection. The corticosteroid will cause a slight elevation in blood glucose level, though not very important for some patients but might be vital with diabetic people. It may also lead in slight discoloration and patients might feel minor clicking of the finger, all of which are normal and are just side effects of the injection.

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